Success Stories

a. We recently settled a case for $992,000 for a construction worker who fell down an unmarked and unguarded elevator shaft. At first, the general contractor denied fault and testified that he warned our client about the elevator shaft, and indeed placed yellow caution tape in front of the doorway. Eventually we subpoenaed two witnesses who testified that the contractor did not warn our client, and that the caution tape was placed in front of the door after the accident.

b. We settled a case for tenants of cigar lounge who were tricked into leasing a store that leaked water and was full of mold for $485,000. Through investigation and discovery, we were able to prove that the landlord knew about the water leaks and mold for a number of years, and concealed this information from our clients when they were in the process of signing the lease.

c. We also just settled a sexual harassment case for $380,000 for a female police officer who was constantly sexually harassed by two of her supervisors. After our client made it clear that she was not interested in any type of relationship with her supervisor, they retaliated against her, and ended up terminating her employment

d. I recently settled a sexual harassment case for $525,000 for an executive who worked in the corporate office of a large retail firm. One of her coworkers started making sexual comments to her and even invited her out to his car. When she refused, he became quite upset and tried to undermine her performance. When she complained to Human Resources, they essentially took sides with the harasser, and refused to investigate or take any corrective action. My client was eventually forced to quit because the tension in the office was more than she could tolerate.
She retained my firm to represent her. I conducted several depositions, and just before trial, the defense firm agreed to a settlement of $525,000.00.

e. I recently settled a case for $1,525,000 on behalf of a young man who fell through a rotted wooden deck in the home he was renting in San Francisco. When he fell, his neighbor heard the noise and called 911. My client suffered several broken bones and had two surgeries.
The landlord was insured up to $1,000,000. Throughout the case, the landlord claimed that he did not have notice of the dangerous condition, and even accused my client of knowing about the rotted deck but neglecting to notify him. Through discovery and investigation with the San Francisco Department of Building & Safety, I was able to put together a trail of written communications that proved that the landlord had notice of the deteriorated deck.
We settled the case during mediation. The insurance company agreed to pay the policy limit of $1,000,000 and the landlord also contributed $525,000 of his own money.

d. I recently settled a case for $1,525,000 on behalf of a young man who fell through a rotted wooden deck in the home he was renting in San Francisco. When he fell, his neighbor heard the noise and called 911. My client suffered several broken bones and had two surgeries.
The landlord was insured up to $1,000,000. Throughout the case, the landlord claimed that he did not have notice of the dangerous condition, and even accused my client of knowing about the rotted deck but neglecting to notify him. Through discovery and investigation with the San Francisco Department of Building & Safety, I was able to put together a trail of written communications that proved that the landlord had notice of the deteriorated deck.
We settled the case during mediation. The insurance company agreed to pay the policy limit of $1,000,000 and the landlord also contributed $525,000 of his own money.

e. I recently represented a young man who worked for a restaurant supply company doing general maintenance. His supervisor asked him to go up to the roof of the warehouse to clean pigeon droppings and repair an opening through which pigeons were entering the warehouse. When my client did as he was asked, he fell through the poorly maintained sheet metal roof and fell to the concrete floor of the warehouse. He had two surgeries to repair his broken bones. The defendants contended that we had no basis for a lawsuit because the case was governed by the Workers Compensation laws. We eventually convinced them otherwise and they settled the case for $950,000.

f. I recently tried a case in binding arbitration on behalf of an elderly woman in an elderly abuse case. My client was a resident at an Assisted Care facility. She was 87 years old and had dementia. The facility experienced an outbreak of scabies which infested my client’s body. My client’s friend was visiting when she noticed that my client was furiously itching, and then discovered scabies bites over her torso and legs. My client was treated at a local hospital and released back to the facility. We tried this case in binding arbitration, and the arbitrator returned the highest verdict permitted by law under the MICRA statutes, $250,000.00.